Vote John for CFB Commissioner 

 

The Need:

There’s a rumbling going on throughout the college football world that it’s time for college football to break off and govern itself. To this end, individuals have begun to discuss how the sport would be governed, and have suggested a commissioner as the central figure in any structure. I don’t necessarily agree with that, but as long as people are creating jobs, I’ll be applying for them.

For too long we've allowed college athletics to be dominated by corporate capitalists whose only goal is not compelling rivalries, good games, and positive experiences for student athletes, but the bottom line of the university-athletic complex. We end that now, now we restore the future to the dreamers. We say, yes we can have historic rivalries, yes we can have amazing individual players, and yes we can have all of this without impoverishing student athletes. Come dream with us and let's all rise up against hyperconsumerism. 

#NotMyHyperConsumerism
— John (said aloud...probably)

PlatforM

Restore power to individual schools by decentralizing the conferences and forcing them to cap themselves at ten members. We don't need all these recruiting regulations, what we do need are coaches and athletic departments being forced to form relationships with student-athletes, and these students being able to make a good decision for themselves and their futures

 

The regular season will be limited to ten games, since each conference is limited to ten members, if teams choose to affiliate with a conference they will play at most nine conference games, and the remainder will be games the schools themselves are free to schedule. They can schedule a lower division school, but it will not be counted toward their win total. At the end of the year a committee will select the 64 best teams, they will not release initial polls or rankings, just the final field after the tenth game of the season is played. The first two rounds of the playoff will be hosted at the higher ranked seed’s home stadium and will take place over the last two weeks of the current regular season. The Sweet Sixteen will be hosted at the current conference championship sites with teams being presorted into set regions: Levi’s Stadium, Santa Clara, CA; Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Atlanta, GA; Bank of America Stadium, Charlotte, NC; Lucas Oil Stadium, Indianapolis, IN; AT&T Stadium, Arlington, TX; Ford Field, Detroit, MI; and two sites to be bid on each year.

After the Sweet Sixteen, there will be a break for exams until the traditional start of bowl season, at which point the four Elite Eight games will take place over the opening Saturday of bowl season with the games taking place in the two bid cities that hosted the Sweet Sixteen games and two cities that currently host bowl games, to be rotated through the entire list of bowl games with the exception of the New Year’s Six Bowl games. Any team that did not qualify for the Elite Eight could accept an invitation to play in a bowl game, and bowl season would proceed as it normally does.

The Final Four games would take place over the course of New Year’s Day, with three of the non-Final Four New Year’s Six Bowls happening New Year’s Eve, and the remaining three bowls happening on New Year’s Day with the Rose Bowl always being held on New Year’s Day. The National Championship would take place two weeks later at whatever city won the  bid to host the game.

In order to qualify for the postseason you must have a 98% graduation rate. If you aren't taking care of your players, you're not getting money. Additionally, we will institute a hard cap on the percentage of university expenses allowed to flow into athletics.

Follow the Olympic ideal. Schools don't have to pay athletes, but athletes can make money however they choose. Schools have no right to profit off of their image or act as if they have a pseudo trademark on their players unless the players sign it away

 

In order to actually protect our student athletes we will begin shrinking the size of the protective gear and eliminate all live ball penalties. Instead referees will assess penalties based on whether or not an action was a dangerous play: first sanction against a player is a yards penalty and an immediate substitution for the remainder of the possession, the second is a two point sanction and expulsion from the game. If a play is particularly egregious, than there can be immediate escalation to the second sanction.